Shiloh Sophia

Short Story Time: Ghosts of Saturday

By Richa Pokhrel/@nepalichoriblog

Photo credit: Richa Pokhrel

Hi everyone! Happy February to you. This year has been pretty good so far and I am enjoying it day by day. The Bay Area’s winter has been comparatively short. While I enjoy the warmer temperatures, I am hoping we get more rain. I am sorry we have not posted any new Nepali Women of the Month interviews but hope to have some your way soon. I decided to share another short story of mine. I’ve mentioned before that it’s always scarier for me to share my fiction work verse my non-fiction writings. Not sure why. I wrote this story after the earthquake and while I like it, I think there could be more words on aama in her spirit form, that needs a little more development. Let me know your thoughts because I am in a rut with fiction writing at the moment.

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Shiloh Sophia

A Brown Woman’s Version of Kipling’s If…

By Rhijuta Dahal/@RizDh 

Photo credit: For All Womankind

This piece is inspired by British writer Rudyard Kipling’s famous poem If (1910). He is also the author of The Jungle Book.  Continue reading “A Brown Woman’s Version of Kipling’s If…”

Shiloh Sophia

Mother Tongue

By Richa Pokhrel/@nepalichoriblog

Photo credit: Wikipedia

For this piece, I decided to share one of my short stories instead of a personal essay. Here is a story I wrote last year and submitted to Duende Literary Journal.  To my great surprise, they had chosen it to be published! I was floored when I got the news because I never thought that an awesome literary journal like Duende would like my work. Sharing my creative work has always been difficult because I am very critical of myself. The strange thing is that when I write personal essays, I feel good about what I write. But with fiction pieces, I am never confident. Do you guys ever feel that about some things you do? I’m working towards not letting that self doubt get in the way of my creative writing.

Continue reading “Mother Tongue”