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Nepali Women of the Now: Richa Neupane

By Richa Pokhrel/@richapokhrel
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This month we have Richa Neupane.  She is currently a Fellow at Teach For Nepal.  Teach For Nepal is a competitive 2 year teaching fellowship that puts recent college graduates in classrooms across the country. Richa currently teaches English at Indreshwori High Secondary School in Sindhupalchowk. She returned to Nepal after the 2015 earthquake in order to work directly with our people and country. In addition to being a teacher, she is part of Code For Nepal,  an organization aiming to increase digital literacy and use of big data. I admire Richa because she came back to Nepal to work even after having opportunities to work and stay in America. I admire her because teaching is not an easy profession, but she is working hard to make sure her students have more opportunities in life. Good luck with the rest of your fellowship, Richa!

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Nepali Women of the Now: Manisha Paudel

By Richa Pokhrel/@nepalichoriblog

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This month I interviewed Manisha Paudel, a Senior Policy Analyst for the City of Tacoma. She works in the Equity and Human Rights department. In my understanding, equity is when people no matter who they are, what their background is have access to opportunities and resources without bias or discrimination. I would like to point out that there is a difference between equality and equity.  Manisha explained that equality is when everyone receives the same thing, but equity is when everyone receives what they specifically need to succeed. In her role she works to inform service providers of this difference and what it takes to close gaps and bring more people from various communities to the table. In addition, she works on creating policy that benefits the whole community, particularly in areas where people have been historically marginalized. Outside of her 9-5 job,  she has been involved with  Amnesty International and leadership – based organizations for more than 10 years.  She served in various capacities in Amnesty International, including Student Group Founder, Regional Group Member Leader, and currently Workshop Facilitator. She is a Nepali woman I admire because she works hard to make sure everyone gets their fair chance at having a quality life.

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Devi, Diva, or the Devil

By Anuja KC/@Anzkc

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Photo credit: WSSCC

I recall the days when I was in school, probably in 6th grade doodling images of houses, cars, trees and everything that filled my imagination while my teacher would lecture to his heart’s content about things that never mattered to me. I was delusional yet very creative at heart. What seemed to my teachers as a diligent note taking was actually my secret escapade to the world of imaginations and possibilities. Sketching was my form of self expression for things that I feared verbalizing in front of the whole class. If I had to summarize my young self in one word, it would be “Devi”. For those who are familiar with Hindu mythology, Devi is a gendered specific term for a female deity, a goddess. In colloquial Nepali language, “Devi” is synonymous to a female who is decent, diligent, disciplined and full of good qualities that society expects a woman should have.

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Man in The Mirror – Looking at Male Privilege in Nepali Society

*Something new on the blog today! We have a male voice speaking about male privilege in our society. We hope you like that we’ve switched things up a bit. Please discuss.

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Photo Credit: http://www.pokeyournose.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/Patriarchy.jpg

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Happy Teej!

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Photo credit: Wikipedia

For those of you who celebrate, wishing you a beautiful few days! For those of those of you who don’t celebrate, check out our past entries on the holiday.

  1. Why I Choose To Celebrate Teej
  2. Speaking Up & Teej
  3. Bejeweled & Hungry

*Are you celebrating this year? If so, how? If you are not celebrating, what are you doing instead?

 

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Swimming Upstream

By Rhijuta Dahal/@RizDh

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Image Credit: The Duluth Model

 

I remember the drive vividly, we were on our way to the airport to drop off our late grandparents after their visit. They were talking about everyone they’d met and how hospitable everyone had been. One of them said, when referring to one family in particular, that they must be so dukhi  because they only have one daughter. To which I quickly responded, why would they be sad? The daughter brings them just as much joy, they give so much to her, and they probably don’t want a son. My grandfather quoted, “even all fingers on our hands aren’t the same size”. I couldn’t respond back, either by shock or because I have been told to “respect” elders, regardless of whether they are worthy of respect, I don’t know. Continue reading “Swimming Upstream”

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Yes, I Am A Woman!

By Sambidha Sen Thakuri

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Image credit: Genius Quotes

 

Okay, I have to admit, I was raised like a boy. I bought track suits instead of frocks and sneakers instead of sandals. As I was growing up, my friends frequently told me that I was tomboyish. I didn’t know what it meant then. What girl would want to befriend someone with whom they could not enjoy talking about their new dresses or someone who wouldn’t compliment them about the color of their nail polish? It was not that I wasn’t interested, but I had some other interests. This included only a few people in my friends circle.

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